Lomography Color Tiger 110

After a few heart-breaking disasters with expired 110 film, I decided to quit tempting fate and use some factory fresh cellulose from the fine folks at Lomography.

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Alabama mountains in the fall. Lomography Color 110, shot on a Rollei A110, developed by LomoLabs, NYC, no edits.

Lomography started making new 110 film with their Peacock slide film (intended for cross processing) and expanded to Orca Black and White, Lobster Red Scale 110 and  Tiger Color Negative.

Lomography Tiger 110 film comes in ISO 200 and is available by the individual 24 shot cartridge or in a three pack. Most 110 cameras are either pre-set to ISO 100 or could select between 100 and 400 ISO depending on the absence or presence of a small tab on the side of the cartridge. Cameras with this technology will read this film as 100 ISO, but the range of the film can easily handle this inaccuracy.

I was impressed with the results, this film has great color rendition and fine grain. It has performed well in all of the cameras I have loaded with it and has produced some beautiful prints and scans. I have had this film developed at both Fuji labs, through my local Wal-Mart, and LomoLabs, NYC and both have done a fine job; but since LomoLabs is the only one of the two to offer 110 scans as well as prints, they are now my go-to lab for this format.

One thing to note, however, is Lomo 110 film has a tendency to have light leaks due to pinholes in the backing paper. Some prints seem to have only a few, but others have lots of little orange spots. Lomo has never clarified if this is a bug or a feature, but as they have been no doubt aware of this issue for some time, I am inclined to call it a feature of the film. I don’t mind it but if you do, simply put a piece of tape over the back window and count your exposures manually. Austerity Photo has an article on it with quite a few examples.

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Graffiti ruins a rock outcropping in the mountains of central Alabama, this photo offers a great example of the light leaks common to Lomo 110 film. Lomography Color Tiger 110, Rollei A110, LomoLabs, NYC. No edits.

Even with the occasional light leaks (and isn’t lo-fi, artsy and quirky kind of Lomography’s thing?) I highly recommend this film. And that’s a good thing, considering it’s the only fresh film in the format.

 

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